HONG KONG

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D4 / 70 – 200 f2.8 / Central

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DX / 70 – 200 f2.8 /

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D4 / 70 – 200 f2.8 /

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DX / 70 – 200 f2.8 /

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DX / 70 – 200 f2.8 /

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DX / 70 – 200 f2.8 /

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DX / 70 – 200 f2.8 /

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DX / 70 – 200 f2.8 /

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DX / 70 – 200 f2.8 /

Huangyaguan Changcheng

Maurice is first to slip under the main gate, deftly ducking and rolling under the China-red wrought iron gate, and with an almighty creak unbolts the locked blockade from inside. The monolithic gateway gently swings outwards, leaving just enough space for us to slide through before locking it tight once again…

Flashgun vs Shotgun

FLASHGUN VS SHOTGUN What started with an innocent purchase on the outskirts of Kashgar's bustling cattle market, ended with a full-frontal shotgun submission in the farthest reaches of China’s western borderlands. Growing up, I watched the Moomins on television, read...

The Great Wall

THE GREAT WALL Grey mists and a stiff breeze usher in a welcome morning, eye-lids rocking open to swirling cloud overhead, a rolling, tumbling viscous soup caressing the wooded landscape. The dense valley tree line acts as a natural filter, slowing the smothering...
WHY #10IMG?

After 15 years shooting digital, my field-work attitude had shifted for the worse; I became accustomed to the high FPS my Nikons could turn over, became lazy when bracketing for HDR, began to abuse high ISO, just accepting the grain in all weather. I’d even leave my tripod at home and just make do with image stabilistion. Above all, I’d become lazy, relying on technology to finish a process I’d start in my mind. I didn't start like that during my analog days; back then it was sacrilege to 'fill the buffer', as it were - we thought, composed, and captured with each and every click. Romanticised maybe, but true.

So I changed.

Capturing one solid image for a collection is pretty easy, anyone can take a great image with a bit of skill, practise, and luck. Seriously, anyone. Two great images - still not hard and sometimes they even look good together. Three, four, and five start taxing the cranium; you need to start thinking ahead, above, and beyond. You start to sweat. Working up to ten images takes dedication, time, and skill, but once you have your collection, you get a real sense of achievement.

Forcing ourselves to select a limited number of images amongst an infinite number of possibilities enables us to think deeper about our photography, it gives us motivation and focus during times of lack-luster malaise, and it aligns our thoughts, encouraging exploration and thematic expression in collections.

IOIMG isn't typically about obsessive image matching for competitions or exhibitions (although I'd go so far as to say the images in your collections should, in some way, compliment each other), nor is it particularly constrained when choosing subjects or themes for image pools; I like to use  IOIMG as more of a guiding principle designed to help maintain standards and encourage exploration in my photography as I explore the many different avenues within the discipline.

Without a guide, we'd get lost.

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